The revival of ox cheeks a few years ago took the classic to a new level. There is hardly a (carnivorous) food blogger who does not publish a recipe of it at least once a year.

In the CHEFS'S CLASS, we will show you how it's done, regardless of the aroma: Braising ox cheeks.

The origin of the meat is also important for this cut. For example, German pieces are always divided with the so-called trichinella cut. The background is the meat inspection by the veterinarian after slaughter. Purists often look for Irish goods because the meat . . .